The Gender Equality Agenda Must Be Inclusive of Women with Disabilities

A picture of a Black, blind person with short hair. They are wearing necklaces in tones of yellow, red black and white, and a pink scarf around their shoulders. Photo credit: Canva
A picture of a Black, blind person with short hair. They are wearing necklaces in tones of yellow, red black and white, and a pink scarf around their shoulders. Photo credit: Canva
  1. Include a disability perspective in the planning of events. Registration forms which include questions on reasonable accommodations are a good example of this. While differences may pose challenges, they also create opportunities to design tailored systems and strategies that will allow for the full inclusion and participation of people with disabilities.
  2. Accessibility is more than a checklist for compliance. It is a human right. Incorporating the principles of Universal Design — designs that work for all irrespective of their ability, age or status — can help improve the user experience for everyone. Common accessibility features to consider incorporating for online events include touchscreens, visual support for auditory information, closed captioning, text-to-speech cap, zooming in on websites, documents and images, transcripts and interactive captions for video content and image descriptions. Be sure to consult support sites to enhance accessibility. A few examples include Rooted in Rights accessibility guide; RespectAbility’s accessibility toolkit, and Harvard’s tips for hosting accessible virtual events and meetings.
  3. Efforts must be made to engage with and leverage the expertise of women with disabilities and their advocates to support the design, implementation and the monitoring of future events.
  4. Institutions and organizations must be held accountable for their responsibility to include everyone and to not leave anyone behind. Clarity on guidelines to accomplish this must be provided at the beginning, so accommodation begins early in the process and is not merely an afterthought.

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Sharing advocacy strategies and legal news for women’s rights and disability rights globally. Send us your news, retweet ours. Check out http://WomenEnabled.org

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